"Aunt"

May. 31st, 2016 03:29 pm
So I use both the English (American) term "aunt" and the Shanghainese/Mandarin Chinese term "ayi" or "aiyee" for not only a parent's sister, but basically any woman of my parents' generation who is either a blood or marriage relative, or a close family friend. For example, my mother's cousin is my aunt, I don't actually know how Aunt Lee is related to me, and Y*** Aiee is my childhood best friend's mother.

I'm curious how widespread this is. At first I thought it was just a Chinese thing, but then I remembered Aunt Lee (from my father's side). Do other people use Aunt and Uncle this way, or is it just my family?
Here's a mirror image of the chop, so it should be "readable" this way.

stamp_mirrored

People are still stumped so far, so my plan is to bring it with me to NYC next time I go, and see if I can track down someone there who can look at it in person and read it.
I have a Chinese chop, in traditional characters. It is possible that it contains my name in Chinese (Szu Sung-Eh), or it could be something else entirely ("licensed prostitute"). I can no longer write my Chinese name, but I think I would recognize it if hand written, and certainly the last symbol doesn't look like anything I recognize (that and my name is three parts, not four).

Below the cut are images of the stamp/print, and the chop itself. Click for bigger.

Chop chop! )

If you know what it says, please enlighten me.

Edit: A mirror image of the chop and further discussion can be found here.

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